The new face of family

THE NEW CANADIAN FAMILY: The number of same-sex married couples has nearly tripled. Illustration: David Anderson http://davidandersonillustration.com
THE NEW CANADIAN FAMILY: The number of same-sex married couples has nearly tripled. Illustration: David Anderson http://davidandersonillustration.com
By on November 1, 2012

The face of the Canadian family is changing. There are more common-law couples, single parents and same-sex couples in our households than ever before, according to the latest data released Sept. 19 from Statistics Canada’s 2011 Census of Population.

And while the traditional family structure-mother, father and children-still accounts for two-thirds of all Canadian families, the number of traditional families as a proportion of all families declined in the five-year period between 2006 to 2011.

The census counted a total of 9,389,700 families in 2011. Of these, 67 per cent consisted of married couples, down from 70.5 per cent a decade ago. In contrast, common-law couples increased by 13.9 per cent in 2011, and single-parent families rose by 8 per cent that same year.

The number of same-sex married couples nearly tripled between 2006 and 2011-the five-year period following the legalization of same-sex marriage in Canada. The census counted 64,575 same-sex couple families in 2011, an increase of 42.4 per cent from 2006. (Statistics Canada later stated that the number of same-sex married couples may have been overestimated by as many as 4,500.)

The census also showed that 92.1 per cent of Canadians 65 years of age and older are living in private households. More than half (56.4 per cent) are living as part of a couple, a slight increase from 54.1 per cent in 2001. The number of seniors who live alone was down slightly, to 24.6 per cent in 2011 from 26.7 per cent in 2001.

Author

  • Marites N. Sison

    Marites (Tess) Sison was editor of the Anglican Journal from August 2014 to July 2018, and senior staff writer from December 2003 to July 2014. An award-winning journalist, she has more that three decades of professional journalism experience in Canada and overseas. She has contributed to The Toronto Star and CBC Radio, and worked as a stringer for The New York Times.

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