Next Sacred Circle planned for June 2020

Indigenous Anglicans lead the Council of General Synod (CoGS) in a hymn Friday, Nov. 8. (l-r): Judith Moses, Canon (lay) Donna Bomberry, Archbishop Mark MacDonald, Shilo Clark, Canon Murray Still, Canon Ginny Doctor. Photo: Matt Gardner
By on November 8, 2019
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Mississauga, Ont.

The next gathering of Sacred Circle—a meeting of Indigenous Anglicans from across Canada—will be held June 14-19 in Orillia, Ont., the Council of General Synod (CoGS) heard Friday, Nov. 8.

Sacred Circle—the largest gathering of the Indigenous Anglican church—is normally held every three years. It met most recently in August 2018, so the next meeting will come a year earlier than usual. But organizers felt that after the passing of a number of resolutions at General Synod last July formalizing the creation of a self-determining Indigenous church within the Anglican Church of Canada, they wanted to move as quickly as possible on “putting some meat on the bones of what a self-determining Indigenous church will look like,” Canon Murray Still, co-chair of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP), told CoGS.

The agenda, he said, will include topics such as finances and stewardship, with the short-term objective of setting up some benefits for currently non-stipendiary Indigenous Anglican clergy, he said.

Still also said the first meeting of Sacred Beginnings, a gathering for youth that ACIP hopes will be annual, is planned for March 15-18 in Beauséjour, Man. The main goal, he said, will be to help young Indigenous Anglicans learn about their spiritual heritage. It will be attended by about 32 people.

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  • Tali Folkins joined the Anglican Journal in 2015 as staff writer, and has served as editor since October 2021. He has worked as a staff reporter for Law Times and the New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal. His freelance writing credits include work for newspapers and magazines including The Globe and Mail and the former United Church Observer (now Broadview). He has a journalism degree from the University of King’s College and a master’s degree in Classics from Dalhousie University.