Documentary tells survivors’ stories

Freddy Taylor, a well-known native artist spent 10 years at the Mohawk Institute, an Indian residential school in Brantford, Ont. Photo: YouTube/Silent Thunder
Freddy Taylor, a well-known native artist spent 10 years at the Mohawk Institute, an Indian residential school in Brantford, Ont. Photo: YouTube/Silent Thunder
By on July 17, 2012

Peterborough’s CHEX Newswatch has produced a 45-minute documentary about the history of the Indian residential schools in Canada and the challenges of healing and reconciliation between aboriginal and non-aboriginal peoples

“Silent Thunder: The Search for Truth and Reconciliation,” includes three former students of residential schools in Ontario, who talk about their experiences at the church-run, federally-funded institutions. They include Freddy Taylor, a well-known native artist, who spent 10 years at the Mohawk Institute, an Indian residential school in Brantford, Ont.

Former students who participated in the hearings conducted in May by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission at Trent University, Peterborough, Ont., are also featured in the documentary.

Silent Thunder also includes interviews with indigenous leaders and people involved in truth and reconciliation efforts, including Anglican Archbishop Terence Finlay, the primate’s envoy on residential schools.

Silent Thunder can be viewed here.

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