Anglican Journal Newspaper

November 2021 Issue

National News

November issue examines what we can control—and what we cannot

National News

‘No, they weren’t in vain’

The rapid collapse of the Western-backed Afghan government this year following the withdrawal of U.S. forces and subsequent return to power of the Taliban have prompted discussion about the legacy of the war in Afghanistan. Canadian troops were deployed in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2014, making the conflict Canada’s longest war.

National News

Long-term care and ‘the great revealer’

When military personnel were deployed to long-term care homes in Ontario and Quebec during the pandemic’s first wave in the spring of 2020, they encountered a system that some had said was in dire need of change even before the pandemic. But COVID-19 brought increased public attention to the system’s shortcomings as it spread through long-term care homes across the country.

Opinion

The illusion of control—and the reality of hope

One of the great illusions when life is stable is that we are in control. The pandemic has shattered that illusion; a tiny virus broke through all our expectations. Plans were disrupted; families separated; and many of the ways in which we manage our lives were no longer effective. We discovered our vulnerability, and that we need each other for survival and are not in control.

National News

Arctic bishop broadcasts to the pandemic-stricken

As the fourth wave of COVID-19 engulfs much of Canada, an Arctic bishop is standing ready to restart a series of weekly radio broadcasts to bolster hope and bring comfort.

Opinion

Rising to the coronavirus’s challenge

Last spring, Anglicans around the world were invited to take part in an international survey by a pair of U.K. academics called “Coronavirus, the Church and You.” The survey ran in three countries: the U.K., the USA and Canada.

Opinion

To find life on a day like this

For many years, I have been troubled by the inability of non-Indigenous people and institutions to receive and grasp the full reality of the pain and challenges of Indigenous life in this land. Statistics and stories are acknowledged with sympathy, but the realization of what this might mean seems completely elusive.